Thailand Visa and Immigration – June 24

As of 1/6/24, requirements for entering Thailand are as below. We also advise you to check your in-country Thai Embassy for their own information.


Pre-Arrival and On Arrival Requirements

  • A valid passport (6 months before expiry) or a border pass (selected countries) for arrivals via border checkpoints.
  • Keep your boarding pass as Immigration asks to see it together with your passport when going through.
  • The TM6 card – that white one you fill in while on the plane or in a hurry on landing – has been suspended from 15/4/24 to 15/10/24. That suspension may be extended again as it could be phased out completely.
  • Covid-19 – no pre flight testing, no vaccination certificates, no mandatory health insurance, no on-arrival testing, no restrictions on travel once in Thailand. Mask wearing is still very common throughout Thailand, particularly in Bangkok.

Visa Exemption, Visa on Arrival, Tourist Visas (Single or Multiple Entry), Extensions – Thailand Visa

Below you’ll find details on the Visa Exemption, Visa on Arrival and pre-bought Tourist Visa (Single or Multiple Entry). For the latter, you don’t need to get one from your local embassy or consulate anymore but can instead use the E-Visa system – create an account and start your application at the official site here.

As of June 24, the Thai Government is also starting to release details on the DTV – Destination Thailand Visa.

Long term Non-O visas, including Retirement, Spouse and Business, are also available. Provided you meet the strict criteria, you can get these once in Thailand or alternatively, it’s also possible to get versions of them from your own Embassy – some countries make it much easier than others.


Visa Exemption – What you Get, What you Need

  • This free Visa Exemption – the automatic stamp you get at the Airport or when you cross a land border – allows you to stay 30 days in Thailand. **Announced on 1/6/24, this will be changed to 60 days but will not be fully operational until late June, July or maybe later – watch this space….***
  • The list of of countries elegible for the 30 day stamp has been extended to 93 and is here. If your country is not on the list, you will likely qualify for Visa on Arrival, see below.
  • The Visa Exemption can be extended by a further 30 days in Thailand at a local Immigration Office, cost 1,900bt. The 30 days extension will not increase to 60 days when the exemption above does.
  • At the land border (visa run), you are permitted to leave (stamp out) from Thailand, walk into the neighbouring country (get their visa/stamp as required) and then return immediately back to Thailand (new 30 day stamp, changing to 60 days in future).
  • Maximum two exemptions per calendar year if using a land border, no limit if entering by air.
  • POOT (proof of onward travel) by air at end of exemption period – maybe requested.
  • Proof of accommodation in Thailand e.g. hotel booking, invitation letter from family or friend in Thailand – maybe requested.
  • Proof of funds – 10,000bt per person, 20,000bt per family – maybe requested.
  • Passport with a minimum validity of 6 months and at least 2 pages left within the passport for the visa and border control stamps.
  • Keep your boarding pass until you exit Immigration.

Visa on Arrival – What you Get, What you Need

  • See here for the full list of 31 countries qualifying for Visa on Arrival.
  • Visa on Arrival gives you 15 days in country but cannot be extended.
  • Passport with at least 1 month validity and at least 2 blank pages.
  • Application form (TM88), fully completed, 1 x recent photo.
  • Proof of funds to 10,000bt per person, 20k per family.
  • Proof of accommodation in Thailand e.g. hotel booking, invitation letter from family or friend in Thailand.
  • POOT (proof of onward travel) by air (within 30 days).
  • 2,000bt per visa.
  • Keep your boarding pass until you exit Immigration.

Single Entry Tourist Visa (SETV) – What you Get, What you Need

We expect this to change in the future as it will be somewhat superceded by the new 60 day free visa exemption (when that becomes fully operational).

  • You can stay for 60 days and then extend the visa for further 30 days at a local Immigration Office for 1,900bt.
  • You must show POOT (proof of onward travel) by airline ticket.
  • Proof of accommodation in Thailand e.g. hotel booking, invitation letter from family or friend in Thailand
  • Financial evidence e.g. bank statements, proof of earnings, sponsorship letter – your embassy will specify how much on your initial enquiry.
  • Passport with a minimum validity of 6 months and at least 2 pages left within the passport for the visa and border control stamps.
  • Visa is valid for 6 months from date of issue. Note as it is single entry that is immediately used up when you first come into the country. If you pop out to Siem Reap, for example, the visa is cancelled the moment you pass through border control and any days remaining, lost. You can come back into the country but it would be on a visa exemption (see above).
  • Guide fee if UK application – £30.00

Multiple Entry Visa (METV) – What you Get, What you Need

With the changes to the visa exemption, this will now make more sense for longer stays.

  • You can stay for 60 days and then need to either leave the country and re-enter, so triggering the next 60 days or you could stay in country and extend the visa for further 30 days at a local Immigration Office for 1,900bt – same as the SETV above. If you extend, you can then leave the country and re-enter again and start another 60 days. This process can be repeated in some or other combination of leave/extend for the validity of the visa (6 months from date of issue). To get the full time possible with this type of visa, you must ensure you leave the country to re-enter in the very last days before that 6 month expiry date.
  • You must show POOT (proof of onward travel) by airline ticket.
  • Proof of accommodation in Thailand e.g. hotel booking, invitation letter from family or friend in Thailand (with utility bill).
  • Passport with a minimum validity of 6 months and at least 2 pages left within the passport for the visa and border control stamps.
  • Financial evidence e.g. bank statements, employment or pension
    • Using UK as a guide, this must show £5,000 in the account for 6 months or £10,000 if a couple
    • Employer’s letter showing employment.
    • If you are self employed, proof of this is required. Again, as a guide, for UK citizens the proof is a SA100 HMRC tax return for for the latest tax year.
    • If retired, proof of pension etc. an any age and receiving a private pension a copy of this pension is required.
  • Guide fee if UK application – £150.00

Exemption from Visa, Tourist Visa – In country Extensions

You will need to take the following documents and copies if you want a 30 day in-country extension to your 30 day Visa Exemption or Single Entry Tourist Visa (SETV) or Multiple Entry Tourist Visa (METV).

  • Your passport.
  • A passport photo (3.5 cm x 4.5 cm).
  • Copies of the main page of your passport (photo, date of birth page), page showing the current visa or stamp
  • You may need a proof of residence at some Immigration Offices. It could be a rental contract, payment for hotel.
  • A copy of the Departure Card (TM6) – the white one which you filled in at the airport or border, normally stapled in by the Immigration Officer – this has been suspended from 15/4/24 to 15/10/24 and may be phased out completely.

You can get the actual application form (TM7) on arrival at the Immigration Office. The cost is 1,900bt, THB cash only.

You can extend up to a week before the expiry date, with the extension dated from the date in your passport. If you expiry date falls on a weekend or holiday, it is very important that you make the extension in the days before. You cannot extend if it has already run out.


Destination Thailand Visa (DTV) – Thailand Visa and Immigration

Full details on this new visa which targets digital nomads and remote workers will start feeding through from 1st June 24. It will not be up for quite some time. Here’s what we know so far:-

  • Stay up to 180 days, extendable in country once for a further 180 days. Unclear yet as to whether you can leave the country and immediately start the process again or not?
  • 10,000bt fee for initial visa and 10,000bt for each extension. Can change to a different visa in country, though DTV would be cancelled.
  • Valid for 5 years, that is, the DTV can be used within 5 years of issue (not that you can stay for 5 years).
  • Work for overseas clients/companies only while in Thailand.
  • Proof of support/guarantee to at least 500,000bt.
  • Proof of employment income from a registered company (in your country) – details still to be released but likely to be similar to the 500k figure as as an annual figure.
  • Must be 20 years and upwards.
  • Potentially able to bring spouse and children under 20 years – again waiting on more information on this and how it relates to the minimum guarantee figure.

Non Immigrant Type ‘O’ – Thailand Visa and Immigration

There are a whole host of other longer stay visas, known as Non Immigrant Type ‘O’. These include O (dependent), O-Ed (education), O-A (retirement) and O-B (business), with details found at www.mfa.go.th/main/en/services/, the official site for visa information and procedures. We also do our own comprehensive round up in our property buying page here.

If you meet he strict criteria for issue, Non Immigrant Type ‘O’ visas have a year validity. Annually, you can then apply for an extension (also 1 year validity). Note that you will always have to satisfy the same criteria as at the original application before the extension is issued.

You need to report to an Immigration Office (or online) every 90 days if you are on this type of Thailand visa. You do not physically need to leave Thailand.

If you do wish to leave the country, you must first obtain a Re-Entry Permit before exiting. If you leave with getting one, then the visa is cancelled. You then must start the whole application process over again.

To confuse matters, please note that consulates and embassies in different countries issue their own version of retirement and business visas (with 3 month and 6 month vailidity), which work in a different way. Such visas do require you to leave the country after 60 days (or extend for 30 days and then leave) in order to activate the next 60 days – always check the stamp in your passport closely for exit days.


Documents needed for 90 Day Reporting and Re-Entry Permit

For 90 day reporting, if you cannot do it online here, you will need to take the following documents and copies.

  • Your passport.
  • Copies of the main passport pages (photo, date of birth page) including current visa or stamp
  • Copy of the Departure Card (TM6) – the white one which you filled in at the airport or border, normally stapled in by the Immigration Officer.
  • copy of house rental contract or house book.

You can get the actual application form (TM47) on arrival at the Immigration Office. There is no charge.

For the Re-Entry Permit (if required), take as above. You should not require Proof of residence. You can get the actual application form (TM8) on arrival at the Immigration Office. The cost is 1,000bt for a single entry and 3,800bt for multiple entry, both valid for as long as the visa or the extension stamp.


Overstay – Thailand Visa and Immigration

Immigration now views overstaying your Thailand visa much more seriously than in years gone by. It is best to stick to the rules. The fine is 500bt per day, though the first day is not charged. Children over 7 are eligible for this fine too. You normally pay it at the the airport on departure.

Thai Immigration has targeted long term overstayers for the last couple of years. If you do deliberately overstay (and those doing it know what we mean by that) and are tracked down, expect to be fined and thrown out with a Barred from Visiting Thailand stamp in the passport. The length of that ban is taken on a case by case basis, 1 year upwards.


Immigration Offices – Laem Ngop, Koh Chang – Thailand Visa

immigration office laem ngop thailand visa
Laem Ngop Immigration

Laem Ngop is the small fishing town opposite Koh Chang, also home to Laem Ngop Pier (for Koh Mak) and the Naval Museum. It is 3 kms or so from Trat Ferry (old Centerpoint) Pier and 8kms from Ao Thammachat Pier (both for Koh Chang). Laem Sok Pier (for Koh Kood) is 40 kms away in the Trat City direction. Trat itself is 17 km away.

To reach Laem Ngop Immigration from Koh Chang, take a ferry from either Ao Sapparot (Ferry Koh Chang, the fast one, regular) or Trat Ferry Pier (09.00 or 12,00, an hour), 80bt per person and then a 20/10 minute songthaew taxi, price dependent on how many people. To get back, it’s probably best to walk towards the port and lighthouse (end of street, turn right) and find a taxi there.

If coming from Koh Mak, you arrive at Laem Ngop Pier by speedboat, It is a 10 minute walk to the Immigration, simply take a right turn opposite Thida Tours at the foot of the pier. You could also use a songthaew.

If coming from Koh Kood, you will need a private car, please do contact us for a quotation.

You can contact Laem Ngop Immigration on 098 485 0393 or 039 581-776, Line id: laemngopimm, open 08.30 to 16.30. It’s closed for lunch from 12.00 to 13.00.

On Koh Chang itself there is also a tiny Immigration Office opposite Flora i Talay Resort on Chai Chet Beach. This can deal with general questions and also 90 day reporting for those on longer visas. If you need to pay for a service such as extensions to tourist visas or re-entry permits, you will always need to head to Laem Ngop.

The hours are the same hours for the Koh Chang office (their number is 039 597 261).


UPDATED 5th June 2024

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